From the Land 4/3

announcements

Beef shares are here! If you’ve signed up, please make sure you pick it up today, unless you want it thawed.

food for thought

full share: baby kohlrabi, red potatoes, quinoa leaves, carrots, fennel, flat-leaf mustard, rutabaga, and swiss chard!

partial share: baby kohlrabi, red potatoes, quinoa leaves, and carrots!

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veg of the week

quinoa leaves: Chenopodium quinoa

The most commonly eaten and familiar part of this chenopod are the seeds, though they are often mistaken as a grain. But as we’ll discover today, the leaves are also quite delicious and are a great substitute for spinach! Chenopods, members of the goosefoot family, include beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds (and yes, the lamb’s quarters from a few weeks ago!). Quinoa originated in the Andes, where it was domesticated for human use 3,000-4,000 years ago, and where it remains a staple part of the Andean diet. Its popularity in Europe and the US continues to rise, and though it is not commonly grown in those regions it is easy to grown in a variety of soils, is pest resistant, and requires very little water! Quinoa leaves can be harvested from the plant throughout the growing season, which makes it a great garden vegetable. Make sure you get the seeds from a seed company, because when sold through the grocery stores some of the bitter Saponin coating (which must be present for it to sprout) is washed off.

Uses: Quinoa leaves are similar in taste to spinach. Eat raw in a salad or cooked in a stirfry!

Nutrition: Quinoa leaves, as well as the grains, are high in phosphorus, B vitamins, calcium, iron, vitamin E.

To store: Store in a plastic bag in your refrigerator’s crisper drawer to keep fresh, and the leaves will last for a couple weeks.

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kohlrabi, fennel and blueberry salad
adapted from delish
serves 6

  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
  • 2 T minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 T minced shallot
  • 1 T white balsamic vinegar
  • 1 T mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 t Dijon mustard
  • 1 t soy sauce
  • 1 t pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 C grapeseed oil
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 1 bunch kohlrabi, peeled and very thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 1 bulb fennel, trimmed and thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 1/2 C semifirm goat cheese, shaved
  • 1 C blueberries or pitted, halved sweet cherries
  • 2 T torn mint leaves

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spread the almonds on a pie plate and toast for about 7 minutes, until golden. Let cool.

In a mini food processor or blender, combine the ginger, shallot, vinegar, mayonnaise, mustard, soy sauce, and maple syrup and puree. With the blender on, add the grapeseed oil in a thin stream and blend until creamy. Season the dressing with salt and pepper.

In a large bowl, toss the kohlrabi with the fennel, cheese, toasted almonds, and dressing. Season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Add the blueberries and mint and toss gently. Serve right away.

rutabaga quinoa greens tart
adapted from myrecipes
makes one 8″ tart

  • 1 rutabaga
  • 1 C fine, dry breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 C all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 C grated Parmesan cheese, divided
  • 1/2 C milk
  • 1 bunch quinoa leaves
  • 6 bacon slices, cooked and crumbled
  • 1/4 C butter, melted and divided

Place a baking sheet on bottom rack of oven. Heat oven to 400°.

Peel rutabaga. Cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices, then in half.

Stir together breadcrumbs, flour, and 1/4 cup cheese in a shallow dish.

Dip half of rutabaga slices in milk, and dredge in breadcrumb mixture. Arrange evenly in greased 8″ round pan, allowing outer edges of rutabaga to fit around edge of pan.

Arrange spinach over rutabaga. Sprinkle with bacon and remaining 1/2 cup cheese, and drizzle with 2 tablespoons butter.

Dip remaining rutabaga slices in milk; dredge in breadcrumb mixture. Arrange over cheese. Drizzle with remaining 2 tablespoons butter. Top with a sheet of aluminum foil; press an 8-inch round cakepan onto tart. Place tart in oven on preheated baking sheet, and top with a large heavy skillet.

Bake at 400° for 40 to 45 minutes.

carrot, fennel and red lentil soup
adapted from epicurious

  • 2 T sunflower oil
  • 1 fennel bulb, sliced thinly
  • 5 carrots, sliced thinly
  • 2 leeks, sliced thinly
  • 2 stalks lemongrass, minced
  • 1 ½” large piece of ginger, grated
  • ½ ” fresh turmeric, grated (or 1 t dried)
  • 1-4 small chilies, depending on heat desired
  • 1 C red lentils
  • 3 qts water
  • 1 T coriander seed
  • 1 ½ t cumin seed
  • ½ t brown mustard seed
  • 1 t black peppercorns
  • ¼ t fenugreek powder
  • 1 t salt
  • 5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 lemon, half juiced, the other half cut into wedges for serving
  • ¼ C cilantro, chopped

You’ll need a mortar and pestle, a food processor, or clean coffee grinder. Otherwise, substitute pre-ground coriander, cumin, and black pepper and use the brown mustard whole.

Heat up a soup pot on medium heat with the sunflower oil. Add the fennel bulb, carrots, and leeks and simmer, stirring occasionally until soft—about 12 to 15 minutes. While cooking, peel outer layers of lemongrass, and finely chop the tender base of the stalks. Grate ginger and turmeric, and finely chop the chiles. Stir in lemongrass, ginger, turmeric and chiles and cook for 2 minutes. Add lentils and water, bring flame to high and bring to a boil. Drop flame to a simmer, and cook for 15 minutes.

While soup is cooking, prepare the spice mixture. Heat a small skillet on medium flame. Add coriander seeds and gently agitate pan until you can smell them (1-3 minutes). Transfer them to a mortar and pestle or food processor, and return pan to burner. Do the same for the cumin, mustard, and black peppercorns, toasting each separately. Add fenugreek powder for a few seconds, and add along with salt to the mix. Grind ‘em up, and toss in with garlic to soup when the 30 minutes are up. Cook for 15 more minutes and add lemon juice. Salt to taste.

Serve soup topped with cilantro, hot or room temperature, with a lemon wedge on the side.

From the Land 3.27

announcements

Beef shares will be distributed on April 3 (yes, that’s next week!) They are distributed during regular distribution hours, 12:30-5:45pm. Please make sure you come during the regular hours, as we do not have space to store frozen beef shares! Have you signed up for a share? Since this is our second beef share this year, let’s avoid confusion and I’ll just tell you who has signed up so far! Check this list for your name, and contact me if you have a question or want to sign up.

Julia
Andy
Nancy x 2
Susan
Delisa x 2
Sierra
Amanda
Lois x 2
DJ
Abby
Joseph
Kat
Bill
Nic

food for thought

full share: cabbage, valencia oranges, choice of salad mix or spinach, collard greens, swiss chard, kale, joaquin wheat flour, hakurei turnips!

partial share: cabbage, valencia oranges, choice of salad mix or spinach, and collard greens!

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veg of the week

collard greensBrassica oleracea

Collards (from “colewort” – cabbage plant) are a loose-leafed relative of broccoli and cabbage commonly grown in the southern US, Brazil, Portugal, and many parts of Africa.

Uses: The thick, slightly bitter leaves are a staple of southern US cuisine, and are often flavored with smoked, salted meats, diced onions, vinegar, salt and pepper. A traditional New Year’s dish is steamed collards, cornbread, and black-eyed peas – said to ensure wealth in the coming year because the collards resemble money! The collards can also be sliced thin and fermented as a “collard kraut”.

Nutrition: Collards are a good source of vitamin C and soluble fiber, and contain multiple nutrients with potent anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and sulforaphane.

To store: Collards can be easily stored for 10 days when kept just above freezing at high humidity. Put in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

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In case you’re keeping track, yes, I have included a couple of these recipes in previous newsletters! I am someone who is always looking for new and exciting ways to eat vegetables, and most recipes for collard greens are some variation of boiling the collards with bacon or hamhock, adding salt and a dash of vinegar, and serving them with cornbread. Granted, as someone about to move to Virginia, I know I will soon be inundated with this style of collards offered on the side of every dish I order in a restaurant – and I’m not saying I don’t like collards cooking in this traditional way! But the recipes below are unique and offer a variation on the “standard”.

collard sushi with red pepper and cucumber
adapted from vegan magazine
makes 4 rolls

  • 4 leaves collards
  • 8 T hummus
  • 2 green onions/scallions, chopped
  • 1/2 C cilantro, chopped
  • 1/4 red pepper, cut in thin strips
  • 1/4 small cucumber, cut in thin strips
  • 1/4 C shredded carrots
  • 1/2 -1 lemon and zest

*these ingredients are mere suggestion: use whatever fresh produce you have on hand!

Put about 2 inches of water in a large frying pan and bring to a boil.

Lay the collard green leaves flat, cut off the thick stem at the point where the leaf begins, then pile them on top of each other in the boiling water. Cover and cook for about 30 seconds.

Drain, then lay the leaves flat on a board or counter with the thick part of the stem facing up.

Down the center spine of each collard leaf place a row of about 2 tablespoons hummus, sprinkle with green onions, cilantro and shredded carrots, and place thin red pepper strips and cucumber strips on top (or whatever veggies you are using). Sprinkle generously with lemon juice and lemon zest.

Flip the ends in and gently roll into a sausage shape. With a sharp knife, cut into as many small pieces as possible, or eat roll whole. Voila!

creamed collard greens
adapted from the nourished kitchen
serves 4

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 large yellow onion, peeled and sliced thin
  • 2 bunches collard greens, stems removed, trimmed and chopped
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • freshly grated nutmeg, to taste
  • unrefined sea salt, to taste

Melt butter in a skillet over medium-high until it froths, then toss in sliced yellow onion, stirring until fragrant and a bit caramelized around the edges. Add chopped collard greens to the skillet, stirring until slightly wilted, about two minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low, stir in one cup heavy cream and simmer for about five to six minutes, until the cream is largely reduced. Season with freshly grated nutmeg and unrefined sea salt, serve hot.

marinated collard green salad
adapted from urban organic gardener

  • 1 bunch collard greens
  • 1 lemon or a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
  • a few slices of onion or scallions
  • dash sea salt
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 t raw honey
  • 1 t olive oil
  • dash of paprika

Dice the onions and put into a small bowl. Squeeze the entire lemon over the onions or cover with apple cider vinegar. Chop up the garlic clove and add to onions. Let it sit on the side for the onions to soak in the lemon/vinegar.

Cut up your collards by placing the leaves on top of each other, roll them up tightly and cut across into ribbons. Place into salad bowl and sprinkle with sea salt. Massage down the collards by hand until they start to wilt down. Put to the side.

Back to the onion/lemon juice: add few drops of olive oil, add 1 teaspoon honey and mix or shake well. Pour marinade over the collards and work it in. Sprinkle on paprika. The collards will start to have a “sauteed-like” texture.

Eat the salad immediately or let it sit to marinate until the flavors are to your taste (the longer it sits the stronger the flavor).

From the Land 9.26

food for thought
full share: green beans, cucumbers, tomatoes, beets, collard greens, butternut squash, scallions, and pickles!

partial share: cucumbers, tomatoes, butternut squash, and pickles!

veg of the week

collard greensBrassica oleracea

Collards (from “colewort” – cabbage plant) are a loose-leafed relative of broccoli and cabbage commonly grown in the southern US, Brazil, Portugal, and many parts of Africa.

Uses: The thick, slightly bitter leaves are a staple of southern US cuisine,and are often flavored with smoked, salted meats, diced onions, vinegar, salt and pepper. A traditional New Year’s dish is steamed collards, cornbread, and black-eyed peas – said to ensure wealth in the coming year because the collards resemble money! The collards can also be sliced thin and fermented as a “collard kraut”.

Nutrition: Collards are a good source of vitamin C and soluble fiber, and contain multiple nutrients with potent anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and sulforaphane.

To store: Collards can be easily stored for 10 days when kept just above freezing at high humidity. Put in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

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Welcome Alex!
Hello PCCSA members! I am your CSA’s newest employee. I was lucky enough to snag
the best work study job available. From now on you’ll see me every Wednesday when you pick up your produce and you’ll be hearing from me in the weekly newsletter, talking about whatever interesting stuff you want to know about. If anyone has suggestions on topics please let us know. It can range anywhere from the nutritional value of vegetables to whats happening in Prescott’s food scene.
Here is a little bit about myself and why I’m interested in helping boost sustainable eating and agriculture. I grew up mainly in the SF bay area but moved before starting high school, to rural Oregon. It was always my parents’ dream to own and run a small-family-farm-business. High school for me was slaughtering chickens, building fences, castrating cows and bouncing for hours on a tractor planting acres of crops. My focuses on the farm started off with a chicken operation, an essential aspect of every respectable farm, I believed. I began later to focus more on vegetable and grain production. Since then, and before coming to Prescott, I traveled and worked but always, it seemed, with some sort of connection to food. I WWOOFed (World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms. Look it up if you don’t already know about it. “WWOOFing” is an excellent method of cheap travel). I worked in restaurants and, of course, I ate continuously. I always try to balance my budget with healthy food. Which is why a CSA makes so much sense! I am here to study creative writing, the performing arts and to soak up the amazing creative energy buzzing through this community.
I look forward to meeting every one of you in the coming year! Note: the chicken in the photo consented to sit on my head and was not harmed (until years later when she stopped laying eggs. An old farmers saying, meant as a warning to lazy laying hens, goes “an egg a day keeps the hatchet away”).

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collard sushi with red pepper and cucumber
adapted from vegan magazine
makes 4 rolls

  • 4 leaves collards
  • 8 T hummus
  • 2 green onions/scallions, chopped
  • 1/2 C cilantro, chopped
  • 1/4 red pepper, cut in thin strips
  • 1/4 small cucumber, cut in thin strips
  • 1/4 C shredded carrots
  • 1/2 -1 lemon and zest

*these ingredients are mere suggestion: use whatever fresh produce you have on hand!

Put about 2 inches of water in a large frying pan and bring to a boil.

Lay the collard green leaves flat, cut off the thick stem at the point where the leaf begins, then pile them on top of each other in the boiling water. Cover and cook for about 30 seconds.

Drain, then lay the leaves flat on a board or counter with the thick part of the stem facing up.

Down the center spine of each collard leaf place a row of about 2 tablespoons hummus, sprinkle with green onions, cilantro and shredded carrots, and place thin red pepper strips and cucumber strips on top (or whatever veggies you are using). Sprinkle generously with lemon juice and lemon zest.

Flip the ends in and gently roll into a sausage shape. With a sharp knife, cut into as many small pieces as possible. Voila!

collard greens with butternut squash and chicken
adapted from the nurtured way
serves 3-4

  • olive oil
  • 2 C butternut squash, chopped
  • 6 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 lb chicken
  • 6-8 C collard greens, chopped with stems removed
  • 3 green onions/scallions, thinly sliced
  • A few T of bacon drippings, ghee, or other oil
  • 1 C coconut milk
  • Half of a lemon (optional)

Preheat oven to 350. Prepare a pan and arrange the chicken to bake. Toss the squash and half of the garlic in some olive oil, and place evenly around the chicken. Salt as desired, and bake until done. Chop the chicken (and squash if necessary) into half inch pieces.

In a sauté pan, heat your bacon drippings or oil. Add the remainder of the garlic, and stir until fragrant. Reduce the heat to medium and toss in the onion. Stir until translucent and beginning to caramelize. Mix in the collards and stir until cooked down (a few minutes). Salt to taste, and add in the coconut milk. Return to a boil, then simmer, stirring periodically until the liquid is reduced by half. Add the chicken and squash, add a good squeeze of lemon (if you’d like) and fold in to coat. Let the mixture rest for a few minutes, then serve warm.

marinated collard green salad
adapted from urban organic gardener
makes

  • one bunch collard greens
  • one lemon or a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
  • a few slices of onion or scallions
  • dash sea salt
  • one clove garlic
  • t raw honey
  • t olive oil
  • dash of paprika

Dice the onions and put into a small bowl. Squeeze the entire lemon over the onions or cover with apple cider vinegar. Chop up the garlic clove and add to onions. Let it sit on the side for the onions to soak in the lemon/vinegar.

Cut up your collards by placing the leaves on top of each other, roll them up tightly and cut across into ribbons. Place into salad bowl and sprinkle with sea salt. Massage down the collards by hand until they start to wilt down. Put to the side.

Back to the onion/lemon juice: add few drops of olive oil, add 1 teaspoon honey and mix or shake well. Pour marinade over the collards and work it in. Sprinkle on paprika. The collards will start to have a “sauteed-like” texture.

Eat the salad immediately or let it sit to marinate until the flavors are to your taste (the longer it sits the stronger the flavor).

From the Land 4/18

food for thought
full share: romaine lettuce, red potatoes, oranges, swiss chard, chioggia beets, collard greens, carrots, I’itoi onions
partial: romaine lettuce, red potatoes, oranges, swiss chard

announcements

The Issues of Global Food Production class is hosting a Global Foods Dinner on Monday, April 30 at 6pm. This event aims to educate guests about global hunger and food issues by breaking them into groups representing several different countries and being served a meal representative of that county’s socio-economic breakdown. Free tickets are available through CSA, first-come, first-serve, and guests are requested to bring a canned food item for our food drive to benefit a local food bank. Please let me know if you’re interested in attending or would like more information.

upcoming

The World According to Monsanto
movie showing sponsored by GMO-Free Prescott
April 18 – 6:30pm
Yavapai Title conference room, 1235 E. Gurley

Global Foods Dinner
sponsored by the Issues of Global Food Production class
April 30, 6pm
Prescott College Crossroads Center
ask Erin for more details and ticket info!

last day of Prescott College CSA share
May 2

last day of community CSA share
May 9

Prescott Farmers Market
opens May 12!
Yavapai College front parking lot – 1100 E. Sheldon St.

Prescott Valley Farmers Market
opens June 1
Tim’s Toyota parking lot – corner of Glassford Hill and Florentine

Chino Valley Farmers Market
opens June 7
BonnFire Grill Restaurant – 1667 S. Highway 89

veg of the week

collard greens: Brassica oleracea

Collards (from “colewort” – cabbage plant) are a loose-leafed relative of broccoli and cabbage commonly grown in the southern US, Brazil, Portugal, and many parts of Africa.

Uses: The thick, slightly bitter leaves are a staple of southern US cuisine,and are often flavored with smoked, salted meats, diced onions, vinegar, salt and pepper. A traditional New Year’s dish is steamed collards, cornbread, and black-eyed peas – said to ensure wealth in the coming year because the collards resemble money! The collards can also be sliced thin and fermented as a “collard kraut”.

Nutrition: Collards are a good source of vitamin C and soluble fiber, and contain multiple nutrients with potent anticancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and sulforaphane.

To store: Collards can be easily stored for 10 days when kept just above freezing at high humidity. Put in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer.

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citrus collards with raisin redux
adapted from http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Citrus-Collards-with-Raisins-Redux-352451

  • 1 large bunch collard greens, ribs removed, cut into a chiffonade, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • scant 1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

In a large pot over high heat, bring 2 quarts of water to a boil and add 1/2 T salt. Add the collards and cook, uncovered, for 8 to 10 minutes, until softened. Meanwhile, prepare a large bowl of ice water to cool the collards.

Remove the collards from the heat, drain, and plunge them into the bowl of cold water to stop cooking and set the color of the greens. Drain by gently pressing the greens against a colander.

In a medium-size sauté pan, combine the olive oil and the garlic and raise the heat to medium. Sauté for 1 minute. Add the collards, raisins, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add orange juice and cook for an additional 15 seconds. Do not overcook (collards should be bright green). Season with additional salt to taste if needed and serve immediately as a side dish, on top of pasta or rice, or in quesadillas.

sweet potato soup with smoked collard greens and turkey
adapted from http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Recipes/story?id=2908760#.T48IFNl2Ou0
serves 6

for soup:

  • 3 large sweet potatoes, diced
  • 1 large white onion, diced
  • 1/3 oz olive oil
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1 small bunch-fresh sage
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Couple sprigs of thyme
  • Light brown sugar to taste
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • Pinch of nutmeg

In a medium to large pot over high eat, add olive oil, sweet potatoes and onions, sweat until caramelized. Add chicken stock and bring to simmer. Tie up all fresh herbs with butcher string and add to simmering soup. Once sweet potatoes are tender, with a slotted spoon remove potatoes from pot and place in a food processor. Strain off cooking liquid and set aside, disregarding herbs. Slowly add cooking liquid, butter, brown sugar, salt and pepper to taste to food processor and mix well.

Pour pureed soup into another pot and bring to a low simmer, add heavy cream and butter. Let simmer while cooing collard greens. Finish by sprinkling nutmeg.

for collards:

  • 32 ounces of chicken stock
  • 3 bunches of collard greens, cleaned and de-stemmed
  • 1 large smoked turkey leg (or two chicken legs and a drop of liquid smoke)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 bunch I’itoi onions, diced
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Add the chicken stock, smoked turkey leg, bay leaf, collard greens, onion and salt and pepper to deep pot and place on stove over high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer for an hour.

Remove pot from heat. Using a slotted spoon, remove collard greens and turkey from stock. The turkey meat should be very tender. Pick it from the bone and set aside.

Spoon collard greens into bottom of a bowl and then add a few pieces of turkey meat. When ready to serve, pour sweet potato broth over collard greens and turkey.

collard green cornbread pudding
http://www.bravotv.com/foodies/recipes/collard-green-cornbread-puddingnbsp-frizzled-yams

collard greens:

  • 1/2 smoked turkey wing
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 4 cups yellow onion, cut to about a medium dice
  • 1 bunch collard greens, washed, leafs trimmed from the stalk and roughly cut
  • 7 garlic cloves, sliced thin
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 4 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar (can substitute white wine, red wine or sherry vinegar)

cornbread:

  • 1 cup yellow corn meal
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 cup oil or rendered fat
  • 1 cup milk or butter milk
  • 1 large egg

custard:

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cup half and half

Place smoked turkey in a small pot and add enough water to cover the turkey by about half an inch. Simmer for one hour, skimming foam or fat that floats to the top. This will be the liquid used for braising your greens.

Add butter and onions to a medium sized pot and cook over medium low heat until translucent, about 15 minutes. Add collard greens to the pot along with the turkey wing. Pour in enough smoked turkey broth to barely cover the greens and simmer on a low heat until tender but not mushy, about an hour and 45 minutes. One hour into the cooking, add the sliced garlic and red pepper flakes.

Remove the greens and turkey wing. Strain the excess liquid from the greens and return the liquid to the pot and reduce to half a cup and reserve.

Shred the meat off of the turkey wing and incorporate into the greens, along with the sugar and vinegar- allow to cool.

When the greens start simmering, start the cornbread.

First, set your oven to 400F. When hot, place a 10″ cast iron skillet into the oven.

In a mixing bowl, add all dry ingredients and whisk together. Create a well in the middle and add all the wet ingredients and whisk together until evenly incorporated.

Take hot pan from the oven and with a rubber spatula scrape in all the batter and bake. Check after 20 minute with a toothpick, if it comes out wet, bake for an additional 5 minutes. Allow to cool and cut into roughly 1 inch pieces.

Custard: In a blender, add the eggs, half and half, 1 cup of braised greens (meat and all) and reserved braising liquid. Purée until very smooth.

Rough chop the cooled greens and place in a mixing bowl with the cornbread and the custard. Mix all ingredients together, careful not to break up the cornbread too much. Evenly distribute contents of the bowl in a buttered cast iron or non-stick pan, cover with aluminum foil and bake at 350F for one hour and 10 minute. Allow to bake without the foil for the final 15 minutes.