From the Land 4.17

food for thought

full share: choice of carrots or kale, salad mix, purple top turnips, grapefruit, artichokes, baby swiss chard, fennel, and choice of wheatberries or pinto beans!

partial share: choice of carrots or kale, salad mix, purple top turnips, and grapefruit!

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veg of the week

swiss chard: Beta vulgaris

Chard has been around for centuries. It is of the same species as a beetroot or a common garden beet. Both plants are descendant from the sea beat. The word “swiss” was originally used to differentiate the plant from French spinach varieties. 

Uses: The slightly bitter tasting chard is used in cultures around the world. The fresh young leaves are used raw in salads while the older and tougher leaves are often cooked, steamed, stir-fried on high heat, or sauteed on low heat. The bitterness lessens when cooked, revealing subtle buttery flavors.

Nutrition: Chard is high in vitamin A, C and K. Vitamin K stands for ketamine and helps in blood clotting preventing excess bleeding. Chard is also high in dietary fiber and protein. The stalks are high in iron, hence the red color.

To store: Chard will stay fresh and crispy for 3 days stored in the crisper bin in a plastic bag. Do not wash until ready to eat. To freeze, cut off stems and blanch leaves (dunk in boiling water for two minutes). Drain excess water and store in airtight bags in freezer. They

will stay good for up to a year.

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Fair Trade

By Alex Deck

A Fairtrade product has been produced according to set standards that benefit the producers in a “fair” way. These standards include proper and safe working conditions, wages equal to a set world market value and a Fairtrade Premium. The Fairtrade Premium is extra money that goes to support the community that produced the product being sold. Fairtrade certified products do not have to be organic.

There are many fair trade certifiers. The biggest is Fairtrade International. Here are the labels for products that are fair trade for different certifiers. Look out for these labels in grocery stores.

  Fairtrade International

  Fair Trade USA

  World Fair Trade Organization

Here are the principals of the Fairtrade International company:

  • to deliberately work with marginalized producers and workers in order to help them move from a position of vulnerability to security and economic self-sufficiency.

  • to empower producers and workers as stakeholders in their own organizations.

  • to actively to play a wider role in the global arena to achieve greater equity in international trade.

To learn more go to the Fairtrade International website.

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Raw Swiss Chard Salad with Maple Balsamic Dijon Vinaigrette 
Maple-Balsamic Dijon Vinaigrette
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 T balsamic vinegar
  • 2 t pure maple syrup
  • 2 t organic Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed
Whisk well and serve.
Swiss Chard Salad
  • 1 bunch of rainbow Swiss chard, thinly sliced
  • 1 organic apple, diced and drizzled with lemon juice
  • 1 handful of organic raisins
  • 1/3 C raw walnuts, soaked overnight
  • sweet onion, finely diced
  • fresh sprouts (to garnish)
  • raw sesame seeds (to garnish)
Enjoy this amazing salad tossed with the Maple-Balsamic Dijon Vinaigrette!

Turnip Soup with Bacon
Wayward Seed Farm

  • 1 lb bacon, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 C onion, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 C potatoes, peeled, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 C turnips, peeled, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 4-6 sprigs thyme or 1 bay leaf
  • 1 C greens, torn
  • 1 C cream
  • salt and pepper

In a large sauce pan over medium heat, add bacon. Cover and cook slowly until fat renders, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and pour off all but 1 tablespoon of fat.

Return pan to medium heat, add onion and cook until translucent, about 4 minutes. Do not brown.

Add potatoes and turnips to cook, stirring for 2 minutes. Add thyme, enough water to cover, bring to a boil, and reduce. Cook at brisk simmer for 15-20 minutes until tender.

Meanwhile, cook torn greens in butter or some of the bacon fat over high heat until wilted. Reduce and cook over medium-low heat for 1-2 minutes. Add greens to soup and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Add cream, salt, and pepper. Remove bay leaf or thyme and serve.

If soup becomes too thick, thin with broth, water or cream.

 

Grapefruit Brulee
From: Huffpost Taste

  • 3 large grapefruits
  • 6 T packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 T butter, cut into tiny pieces
  • 1/4 t ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 t freshly grated nutmeg
Position oven rack about 5 inches from broiler; preheat broiler.
Slice the stem end and opposite end off each grapefruit. Stand the grapefruit, one cut-end down, on a work surface. Cut off the rind and pith with a sharp knife, making sure to remove all the white pith. Cut each fruit into 4 rounds, about 1/2 inch thick, by making slices parallel to the ones you made on the top and bottom.
Place the slices in a large baking pan in a single layer. Top each with 1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar, dot with butter and sprinkle with a pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg.
Broil the grapefruit until bubbling and starting to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Drizzle pan juices over each serving.
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From the Land 12.5

food for thought

full share: citrus, purple top turnips, mizuna, kohlrabi, summer squash, spaghetti squash, rapini, and green tomatoes

partial share: citrus, kohlrabi, summer squash, and rapini

veg of the week

rapini: Brassica rapa var. rapa

Also known as broccoli raab, rapini is closer in relation to turnips than to broccoli! It probably descends from a wild herb related to the turnip. It has a unique and complex nutty, bitter taste, and has spiked leaves that surround a bud that looks like a broccoli floret.

Uses: Common in Italian and Chinese cuisine, saute rapini stems and leaves in olive oil and seasonings and serve as a side dish, or use it as a pizza topping or on hot sandwiches. Steaming and/or sauteing mellows the flavor, and boiling with a ham bone takes away the bitterness. Lower temperature for longer time is best. Similarly, substitute rapini for any recipe that calls for turnip greens.

Nutrition: Rapini is a great source of vitamins A, C, and K, and potassium, calcium and iron.

To store: Put in plastic bag and store in crisper drawer.

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Summer Place Pecan Farm – “We grow em! shell em! and sell em!”
by Alex Deck

Some of you may have pecans left from two weeks ago, but I doubt it, they tasted too good. Here is a little bit about where they came from!

30 years ago Dr. Tinlin, known as the Johnny Appleseed of pecans according to their website, found out that Camp Verde, AZ is the perfect place to grow pecans. Camp Verde is about an hour east of Prescott off of  I 17. Every year, just before Valentines day, the farm puts on a Pecan and Wine Festival. This is a good way to check out your local pecan provider.

For those of you wishing you had more of those pecans you’re in luck. You don’t have to make the drive out there, Summer Place Pecans will ship anywhere!

Their products include:

  1. Shelled pecans, large and halved
  2. In-shell pecans
  3. Roasted and Salted pecans
  4. Cajun Flavored pecans
  5. Cinnamon flavored pecans
  6. Pecan shellers and more!

To order email summerplacepecanfarm@yahoo.com or call 928-567-5202

or visit their website

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braised rapini
adapted from closet cooking
serves 4 as side dish

  • 1 bunch rapini, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • salt to taste

Bring a large sauce pan of water to boil, add the rapini and cook until the stalks are tender, about 2-4 minutes. Drain, chill in ice water, pat dry and set aside.

Heat the oil in a pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and sauteed until fragrant, about a minute.
Add the rapini and toss to coat in the oil, garlic, and red pepper flakes.
roasted spaghetti squash with broccoli raab and canellini beans
adapted from clean and delicious
serves 4

  • 1 spaghetti squash
  • olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 bunch broccoli raab
  • 1/4-1/2 C veggie broth
  • 1 C cooked canellini beans
  • 2 T Pecorino Romano/parmesan cheese
  • salt and pepper to taste

Pre-heat oven to 400.

Cut spaghetti squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Brush with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

Place squash flesh side up on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake for 45 minutes or until squash is tender and cooked through. Once the spaghetti squash has cooled enough to be handled, use a fork to scrape out the flesh into spaghetti like strands.

In the meanwhile, heat olive oil over a medium heat in a large non-stick sauté pan. Add garlic and red pepper flakes and cook until the garlic is fragrant, NOT brown.

Add broccoli rabe to the pan and season with salt and pepper. Pour in broth and pop a lid on. Allow to cook for about ten minutes or so or until the broccoli rabe is tender.

Remove the lid and add the spaghetti squash and the beans to the pan. Combine everything together and allow to cook for another ten minutes or until everything is heated through. Adjust seasonings and top with grated cheese.

Enjoy!

sauteed rapini with kohlrabi
adapted from epicurious
  • 1 1/4 pound kohlrabi, bulbs peeled
  • 1/2 t grated lime zest
  • 2 T fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 C extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 bunches rapini
  • 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/3 C salted roasted pistachios, chopped

Very thinly slice kohlrabi with slicer.

Whisk together lime zest and juice, 2 tablespoons oil, and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a large bowl. Toss kohlrabi with dressing.

Finely chop rapini. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Saute garlic until pale golden, about 30 seconds. Add rapini by the handful, turning and stirring with tongs and adding more as volume in skillet reduces. When all of rapini is wilted, sauté with 1/2 teaspoon salt until just tender, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and cool to room temperature. Toss rapini with kohlrabi and pistachios.

From the Land 11.28

food for thought

full share: carrots, pinto beans, dried chiles, Japanese salad turnips, fingerling potatoes, beets, tomatoes, and choice of mache or cabbage

partial share: carrots, pinto beans, dried chiles, and turnips

veg of the week

Carrot: Daucus carota

The most commonly eaten part of a carrot is its taproot, which can come in purple, red, white, yellow and of course orange. Not commonly known, the top greens can be eaten as well. Carrots eaten today have been bred and domesticated to be more palatable with a less woody texture. The earliest uses for carrots were for their aromatic leaves and seeds. Parsley, dill, fennel and cumin, relatives of carrots, are still used for aroma and seasoning. The variety of carrot found in north India (pictured) is not found anywhere else. It is pink-red and is used in salads or grated and cooked in milk.

It appears that the modern carrot was first introduced to Europe in the 10 century. Carrots grow best in full sun. In order to grow straight well-formed carrots it’s best to grow in loose soil free from rocks and other roots. Carrots take about 4 months to mature and suggested planting dates are from January to July.

Uses: Due to carrot’s sweet quality they can be used similarly as fruit, in cakes, puddings, jams and preserves. More common uses are in salads, baked, steamed, and raw, alone or with nut butter, hummus, or other dip.

Nutrition: Only 3% of  β-carotene can be used when eaten raw. This can be increased to 39% when pulped or cooked. β-carotene is partly metabolized into vitamin A in humans. Over-consumption of carrots can cause carotenosis, a  condition where the skin turns orange.

To store: Carrots save for several months in the refrigerator but have the most flavor when eaten fresh. They also store well in a root cellar or in a cool place that is not too damp, in sand or wood shavings.

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About the PCCSA Farm Store

Map and Directions:

The PCCSA store is located in the Prescott College Bookstore on the corner of Garden St. and Grove Ave, right next to O’Reilly Auto Parts.

You can purchase PCCSA items during bookstore hours, Monday-Friday 8am-5pm. All transactions are through the bookstore. Check the cooler in the back of the store and the whiteboard to the right of the register for a list of available veggies and prices. We have a variety of other local products available. Items change often, so check regularly to make sure you don’t miss anything!

Here are the items we try to keep in stock:

  1. Extra veggies from last CSA drop off (Wednesday)
  2. Coffee from Cafe Dona Ella
  3. Coffee from Children’s Peace Project
  4. PCCSA T-shirts
  5. Honey from Eagle Eye
  6. Prickly pear jam from Chino Valley
  7. Jam from Cotton Country Jams
  8. Eggs from Lucky B Acres (Paulden), Whipstone Farms (Paulden) and Rabbit Run Farm (Skull Valley)

Interesting Links

  1. Whipstone farm, a contributor to the PCCSA, has a very full list of recipes on their blog, Perloined Recipe.
  2. For a list of articles by the food activist Michael Pollan go to the Michael Pollan website.
  3. The Center for Addiction Nutrition located in Prescott is an organization that aims to help patients recover from chemical eating disorders through healthy eating.

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chilled curried pinto bean and ginger carrot soup
adapted from cd kitchen
serves 4

  • 1 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 lb carrots — quartered lengthwise — cut into 1/4″ pieces
  • 2 T fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 t curry powder or garam masala
  • 1 can or 1 C cooked pinto beans — rinsed and drained
  • 3 C chicken broth
  • 1 C plain yogurt
  • 2 T chopped cilantro — leaves
  • 2 scallion — finely sliced (white and green parts)

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over moderate heat. Add the onion, carrots, and 2 heaped tablespoons minced fresh ginger and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until the onion has softened, about 3 minutes. Add the curry powder or garam masala and cook the mixture, stirring, for 1 minute more.

Stir in the pinto beans and the broth, turn the heat to high, and bring the liquid to a boil. Turn the heat down to simmer and cook the mixture for 15 minutes or until the carrots are very tender.

In a blender or food processor, puree the soup in batches, then let it cool completely. Cover the soup and chill it until it is cold, at least 2 hours.

Just before serving, whisk in the yogurt, divide the soup among 4 soup bowls, and sprinkle with the chopped cilantro leaves and sliced scallions.

badam – carrot milk
adapted from easycooking
serves 2

  • 2 C milk
  • 4-5 t [or to taste] sugar
  • 20 blanched almonds
  • 1 small carrot, cubed
  • 1 t cardamom powder
  • Saffron strands (optional)
  • handful almonds, chopped

Make a paste of blanched almonds with 2-3 tbsp milk until it becomes a smooth paste, put to the side.

Cook the carrots until soft. Add a few tsp of milk and blend into a smooth paste.
Boil the milk with sugar, add the nut and carrot pastes. Let it cook for 5-7 minutes on slow heat to let the nuts cook.
Mix in the cardamom powder and chopped nuts. Garnish with saffron strands and serve chilled.
beet carrot turnip salad
adapted from farmer dave’s
  • 1 bunch beets
  • 1 bunch hakurei turnips (Japanese salad turnips)
  • 1 bunch carrots
  • 1 cup golden raisins
  • ½ cup sesame seeds
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar

Wash and separately shred root vegetables, shredding the beets last. Leaving some of each root aside, mix most of the shredded roots together with the raisins, sesame seeds and apple cider vinegar. Sprinkle the remaining shredded vegetables in layers on top of the finished salad for an artistic finish.