From the Land 4.17

food for thought

full share: choice of carrots or kale, salad mix, purple top turnips, grapefruit, artichokes, baby swiss chard, fennel, and choice of wheatberries or pinto beans!

partial share: choice of carrots or kale, salad mix, purple top turnips, and grapefruit!

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veg of the week

swiss chard: Beta vulgaris

Chard has been around for centuries. It is of the same species as a beetroot or a common garden beet. Both plants are descendant from the sea beat. The word “swiss” was originally used to differentiate the plant from French spinach varieties. 

Uses: The slightly bitter tasting chard is used in cultures around the world. The fresh young leaves are used raw in salads while the older and tougher leaves are often cooked, steamed, stir-fried on high heat, or sauteed on low heat. The bitterness lessens when cooked, revealing subtle buttery flavors.

Nutrition: Chard is high in vitamin A, C and K. Vitamin K stands for ketamine and helps in blood clotting preventing excess bleeding. Chard is also high in dietary fiber and protein. The stalks are high in iron, hence the red color.

To store: Chard will stay fresh and crispy for 3 days stored in the crisper bin in a plastic bag. Do not wash until ready to eat. To freeze, cut off stems and blanch leaves (dunk in boiling water for two minutes). Drain excess water and store in airtight bags in freezer. They

will stay good for up to a year.

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Fair Trade

By Alex Deck

A Fairtrade product has been produced according to set standards that benefit the producers in a “fair” way. These standards include proper and safe working conditions, wages equal to a set world market value and a Fairtrade Premium. The Fairtrade Premium is extra money that goes to support the community that produced the product being sold. Fairtrade certified products do not have to be organic.

There are many fair trade certifiers. The biggest is Fairtrade International. Here are the labels for products that are fair trade for different certifiers. Look out for these labels in grocery stores.

  Fairtrade International

  Fair Trade USA

  World Fair Trade Organization

Here are the principals of the Fairtrade International company:

  • to deliberately work with marginalized producers and workers in order to help them move from a position of vulnerability to security and economic self-sufficiency.

  • to empower producers and workers as stakeholders in their own organizations.

  • to actively to play a wider role in the global arena to achieve greater equity in international trade.

To learn more go to the Fairtrade International website.

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Raw Swiss Chard Salad with Maple Balsamic Dijon Vinaigrette 
Maple-Balsamic Dijon Vinaigrette
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 T balsamic vinegar
  • 2 t pure maple syrup
  • 2 t organic Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed
Whisk well and serve.
Swiss Chard Salad
  • 1 bunch of rainbow Swiss chard, thinly sliced
  • 1 organic apple, diced and drizzled with lemon juice
  • 1 handful of organic raisins
  • 1/3 C raw walnuts, soaked overnight
  • sweet onion, finely diced
  • fresh sprouts (to garnish)
  • raw sesame seeds (to garnish)
Enjoy this amazing salad tossed with the Maple-Balsamic Dijon Vinaigrette!

Turnip Soup with Bacon
Wayward Seed Farm

  • 1 lb bacon, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 C onion, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 C potatoes, peeled, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 2 C turnips, peeled, cut into ½ inch dice
  • 4-6 sprigs thyme or 1 bay leaf
  • 1 C greens, torn
  • 1 C cream
  • salt and pepper

In a large sauce pan over medium heat, add bacon. Cover and cook slowly until fat renders, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and pour off all but 1 tablespoon of fat.

Return pan to medium heat, add onion and cook until translucent, about 4 minutes. Do not brown.

Add potatoes and turnips to cook, stirring for 2 minutes. Add thyme, enough water to cover, bring to a boil, and reduce. Cook at brisk simmer for 15-20 minutes until tender.

Meanwhile, cook torn greens in butter or some of the bacon fat over high heat until wilted. Reduce and cook over medium-low heat for 1-2 minutes. Add greens to soup and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Add cream, salt, and pepper. Remove bay leaf or thyme and serve.

If soup becomes too thick, thin with broth, water or cream.

 

Grapefruit Brulee
From: Huffpost Taste

  • 3 large grapefruits
  • 6 T packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 T butter, cut into tiny pieces
  • 1/4 t ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 t freshly grated nutmeg
Position oven rack about 5 inches from broiler; preheat broiler.
Slice the stem end and opposite end off each grapefruit. Stand the grapefruit, one cut-end down, on a work surface. Cut off the rind and pith with a sharp knife, making sure to remove all the white pith. Cut each fruit into 4 rounds, about 1/2 inch thick, by making slices parallel to the ones you made on the top and bottom.
Place the slices in a large baking pan in a single layer. Top each with 1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar, dot with butter and sprinkle with a pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg.
Broil the grapefruit until bubbling and starting to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Drizzle pan juices over each serving.
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